©2019 BY TIM BALL

TIM BALL

for

HIGHLAND CITY COUNCIL

Putting Residents First
Vote buttons on flag
 

Dennis LeBaron

(former Councilman)

WHY AM I RUNNING?

I want to help preserve the charming characteristics of Highland City that made it so attractive to us.  I am concerned about the positions and voting records of some of our past  representatives--particularly when it comes to zoning.  Zoning has a huge effect on our local traffic, infrastructure, and schools.  I have fought hard to preserve the low density R-1-40 zoning that is unique to Highland, and am concerned that Highland is being redesigned one development at a time.  I believe in the Highland brand, set forth in the Highland City Vision Statement and General Plan. 

About Me

  • Served LDS mission to Colombia

  • BYU Graduate and Loyal Fan

  • Married to Natalie Ball for 20 years and have 4 kids attending Ridgeline, Timberline, and Lone Peak schools

  • Fluent in Spanish and Conversant in Italian

  • Have also lived in Los Angeles, Seattle, Milan, Caracas, and Chicago

  • Have worked for Time Warner, Pricewaterhouse Coopers, and AG Edwards

  • Owned and operated a franchise for 6 years

  • Currently an Executive Sales Manager at Monnit

  • Currently serving on the Planning Commission

 

Councilman

Brian Braithwaite

Tim is someone we need on the City Council.  I have known Tim for several years and I have been impressed with his thinking process and the decisions he has made as a member of the Planning Commission.  He has the experience and proven record for making sound decisions that will make us a better city in the future.

Chris Kemp

(Planning Commission Chair)

I know Tim to be a man of honesty and integrity.  He will ALWAYS put the best interest of Highland residents above any developer's bottom line.  You can count on Tim to have your back!

Sherry Kramer

(Mtn Ridge PTSA Pres

and Highland Resident)

Tim has been a consistent voice on the Planning Commission for sticking to the zoning master plan.  He attended many city meetings before he was even on the Planning Commission in order to understand the issues.  Tim listens to the residents' concerns as he makes decisions on the Planning Commission and I am confident he will do the same as a City Council Representative.

Derek White

(Lifelong and 4th Generation Highlander)

Tim is just the kind of City Councilman Highland needs: he has common sense in spades, and he has no agenda other than making sure Highland continues to be a great place to live.

ENDORSEMENTS

Mark Thompson

(former Mayor)

"Tim has been a concerned and involved citizen for several years now.  He cares about Highland's history as well as it's future.  I know he has the best interests of the residents of Highland at heart.  Any time spent on the Planning Commission prepares one for the City Council."

Dennis Lebaron

(former Councilman)

"Tim does what he says.  He will put Highland's citizens and values first."

Neal B. Evans

(Longtime Highland Resident)

"Tim has put himself out there over and over.  He's literally pounded the pavement to inform and involve residents.  He's willing to do what it takes to preserve our Highland way of life."

 

Background

Highland is a beautiful place to live.  My wife and I fell in love with it years ago.  

We shopped Utah County for two years in search of the perfect place to create a home for our family.  We chose Highland over neighboring cities because of its open and spacious feel, great schools for our kids, and its proximity to commuter conveniences, as well as to businesses, shopping, and medical facilities.  We were amazed that a city could be so centrally located and still feel rural, peaceful and family friendly.

 

For several years now we have watched the accelerated growth happening all around us and have felt the effects it is having on traffic, infrastructure, and schools throughout Highland.  We are growing increasingly alarmed that the needs and concerns of existing residents seem secondary to some of our elected officials.

 

I have no personal agenda.  No trail to buy back, no park to put in, no developer friends to appease.  I just love Highland for all the characteristics that set it apart.  My desire is to protect the charming and unique bedroom community that has been created here before it is transformed irrevocably.

Highland Issues

Hot topics from Highland Residents include the following:

Parks and Trails

This is an issue that has come up over and over in City Council Meetings.  In Highland we have 18 open space neighborhoods that pay $20 per month toward the maintenance of their neighborhood parks and open spaces.  One by one, open space neighborhoods have petitioned the city about purchasing adjacent open spaces from the city at prices well below market values, and including properties that include public trails.  I am concerned about the legality of this proposed transaction, since technically the open spaces belong to all Highland taxpayers.  As a fee paying resident of an open space neighborhood, I also understand the frustration of these neighbors who feel that the city needs to do better at maintaining the properties.  I would like to see the city improve it's existing parks and make them more usable to all residents (i.e. bathrooms, pavilions, and benches) before they begin charging fees citywide.  And while I enjoy pickle ball, I believe Highland parks should serve Highland residents first and not be built to attract tournaments and tourism.

Business Development

Times are changing and so is retail.  Brick and mortar stores are being closed up in cities all around us, and left as empty shells waiting for a new commercial lease for indefinite lengths of time thanks to online retailers like Amazon. 

I believe the demographic of our city is more likely to do shopping online.  We need to be diligent in tracking internet sales and making sure Highland receives appropriate taxes from the online purchases of Highland residents.

Brick and mortar businesses in Highland are special.  Many of them have come to Highland specifically because they desire the 6 day week.  Many of them out perform their sister stores in other communities.  Many of our teens enjoy jobs that allow them to have a family day.  I understand that for many people our Sunday closing ordinance is still a point of contention.  For me, the issue has been settled by the voters with a referendum petition.  I have heard people argue about choice and agency.  I wonder if those people understand that many businesses in Highland are franchises that would not have the option of "choice" about being open on Sundays without the city ordinance.  They would actually be forced by their franchise agreement to be open and staffed.  This seems unfair to long standing and loyal Highland franchise owners.

 

Zoning

R-1-40 is a formula for low density.  It doesn't mean that every lot is an acre lot, but rather that a prospective developer is limited to one  residential unit per 40,000 square feet--including roads, sidewalks and open spaces (trails and parks).  Average lot size in Highland is actually just under .5 acres, but the R-1-40 zone allows us the wide city streets and park strips that are an added luxury of living in Highland.  Higher density zoning will impact our infrastructure, traffic, and schools.  It is the job of elected officials to protect the quality of life and property values of the residents of the city, not to ensure profitability for the developers.  Government does not control real estate prices and property values.  Every developer wants to be the exception to our General Plan.  Too many exceptions have been made already.

Roads

Highland roads are in desperate need of attention.  In addition to the resurfacing and repairs needed and the costs involved, there are neighboring cities encroaching on our borders and requesting access to (connections with) our roads and utilities because it would save them money.  I am opposed to any city bringing their higher density developments to our back yard and expecting to turn our quiet neighborhood streets into major thoroughfares.  These other cities have a much larger tax base and need to shoulder their own costs.  I also would like to see neighboring cities assist with the cost of traffic lights on intersections where their larger and more dense developments are adding to hazards--like the infamous and accident prone intersection on Highland Blvd and 11800 North.

The Highland City Vision Statement says:

"Highland City is a "bedroom community" with large residential lots, single family homes, natural areas, and open space."

And that's the way we like it!

Did You Know...

ZONING

 Zoning is about density, not lot size.  Most of Highland is currently zoned

R-1-40, but the average lot in Highland is under half an acre.

Zoning is the formula the city uses to determine the maximum

number of units

a developer can build on a piece

of land.

R-1-40= 

Residential 1 per 40,000 square feet

R-1-20=

Residential 1 per 20,000 square feet

This formula includes city streets, parks, and open spaces.

Most open space neighborhoods in Highland are true

R-1-40 density because of open spaces and trails.

TAXES

Highland enjoys a lower property tax rate than Lehi, American Fork, Cedar Hills and Draper.

If brick and mortar commercial development lowered property taxes than certainly Lehi would have a lower tax rate than Highland.

Approximately 75% of Highland's sales tax revenue comes from businesses in neighboring communities like Lehi, American Fork, and Cedar Hills. In 2018 we received approximately $1.6 million.

The reason for a road "fee" and a safety "fee" instead of a tax is because fees can have a sunset clause and thereby be 

eliminated once the bond on the city building is paid.

 

NEIGHBORS

Draper City high density housing developments continue creeping down the mountainside, including a massive development being proposed north of our Beacon Hills.

Another massive, high density development is being planned for the "Flash property" in Lehi that will also connect with Highland Blvd, adding to traffic problems on both Highland Blvd and SR92.

Lehi is also working with the water company to build a retention/recreation pond right behind our Canterbury neighbors on SR92.

American Fork aggressively campaigned to annex the USDC/Boyer property south of Lone Peak High at almost DOUBLE the density that was eventually approved by Highland.

BUSINESS

Businesses in Highland are thriving.  Some stores are top performers in the region.

Meier's Meats and other businesses came to Highland BECAUSE of the 6 day work week.

According to a recent study, Highland is rapidly approaching capacity on space for commercial business.

Commercial development does not necessarily offset property taxes.  Many businesses can be a net negative when considering the effect on infrastructure and the required support from our police, fire, and ambulance.

PARKS/TRAILS

Open Space overlay neighborhoods have provided Highland with 80% of its parks and trails.

The typical open space park doesn't have bathrooms, drinking fountains

or pavilions, and

were designed as an amenity to that specific neighborhood, hence the $20 fee to help maintain the space--similar to HOA fees.

Some open space neighborhoods subsidize other open space neighborhoods' upkeep with their monthly fees.  This is because of the ratio of the number of houses to the size of the park space to be maintained.

75% of Highland Residents live in non open space neighborhoods.  They probably spend more that the $20 open space fee to maintain their larger lots. 

NEIGHBORS

Draper City high density housing developments continue creeping down the mountainside, including a proposed massive high density development north of our Beacon Hills.

A massive, high density development is being planned for the "Flash property" in Lehi that will also connect to Highland Blvd adding to traffic problems on both Highland Blvd and SR92.

Lehi is also working with the water company to build a retention/recreation pond right behind our Canterbury neighbors on SR92.

American Fork aggressively campaigned to annex the USDC/Boyer property south of Lone Peak at almost DOUBLE the density that was eventually approved by Highland.

BUSINESS

Businesses in Highland are thriving.  Some stores are top performers in the region.

Meiers Meats and others came to Highland BECAUSE of the 6 day work week.

According to a recent study, Highland is rapidly approaching capacity on space for commercial business.

Commercial development does not necessarily offset property taxes. Many businesses can be a net negative when considering the effect on infrastructure and the required support from our police, fire, and ambulance.

PARKS/TRAILS

Open Space overlay neighborhoods have provided Highland with 80% of its parks and trails.

The typical open space park doesn't have bathrooms, drinking fountains, or pavilions, and were designed as an amenity to that specific neighborhood, hence the $20 fee to help maintain the space--similar to HOA fees.

Some open space neighborhoods subsidize other open space neighborhoods' upkeep with their monthly fees.  This is because of the ratio of the number of houses to the size of the park space to be maintained.

75% of Highland residents are in non open space neighborhoods.

They probably pay more than the $20 open space fees to care for their larger lots.

THE

CANDIDATE

DEBATE

10/10/2019

THE

CANDIDATE

DEBATE

10/10/2019

THE

CANDIDATE

DEBATE

10/10/2019

Introduction:

Closing Statement:

Entire Debate:

 
 

Share your opinions

Thank you for your interest in my campaign. If you have a question, concern, or would simply like to get in touch, please feel free to contact me.

Register to Vote at utah.gov

 

More Information

In winter of 2017 we worked hard to gather signatures for a Referendum on another R-1-30 Rezone approved by the City Council.  The city also sponsors a survey annually that shows the Residents' opinions support Highland's brand of R-1-40 zoning.  If you are interested in hearing how well the council understands the density issue, the discussion below is typical of what we have witnessed at City Council Meetings over the past several years.

City Council Discusses Zoning 7-18-17 -
00:00 / 00:00